Gentle Medical Imaging Offered for Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

Emily D. Scattergood, MD and Thomas J. Presenza, DO

There is no proven low-dose threshold for ionizing radiation, yet scientists believe there may be a cumulative risk for stochastic effects; therefore, Cooper’s pediatric radiologists weigh the risks before determining if, what type and how much medical radiation they use on children and teens.

“We image only when there is a clear medical benefit and use the lowest amount of radiation necessary,” says Emily D. Scattergood, MD, Head, Pediatric Imaging at Children’s Regional Hospital at Cooper. “We avoid multiple scans and use alternative diagnostic studies whenever possible.”

This philosophy prompted Children’s Regional Hospital at Cooper to participate in the Image Gently campaign, a coalition of hospitals and health care organizations working together to minimize exposure to radiation among children. Because studies show multi-phase scanning is rarely helpful in pediatric imaging, the campaign also encourages scanning once instead of using tests with and without contrast material.

Children’s Regional Hospital at Cooper is the only area facility participating in Image Gently.

In addition, Dr. Scattergood and Thomas J. Presenza, DO, are the only fellowship trained and board certified pediatric radiologists in South Jersey.

Services offered include:

  • X-ray
  • Fluoroscopy
  • CT Scan
  •  Nuclear Imaging
  • MRI (including sedated MRI)
  • Ultrasound
  • In-suite entertainment system for pediatric MRI studies *

*The Children’s Regional Hospital at Cooper is the only hospital in South Jersey offering an in-suite MRI entertainment system designed to distract young patients and decrease stress related to MRI studies.

Referring physicians have digital access to patients’ images and reports within 24 hours. Appointments are available during the day, evenings and weekends.

 For more information, or to make an appointment, please call 1.888.499.8779.

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